CONSTANTINES and OAKLEY HALL at the Pike Room

FRIDAY APRIL 25, 2008
doors at 8PM, show at 8PM
tickets: $10 in advance (buy tickets)

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CONSTANTINES' music, as well as their thundering and inspired live shows, has continually earned the band a loyal following from both music writers and music fans alike, drawing comparisons to The Clash, Bruce Springsteen, Fugazi and Nick Cave. In September 2007, Constantines, Canada's hardest working band, inked a worldwide record and management deal with fellow Torontonians Arts & Crafts. Speculations began to swirl after an on stage announcement was made by band-leader Bryan Webb at 2007's V-Festival on Toronto Island. Formerly signed to Subpop in the U.S., Constantines first rocked their way out of Guelph, Ontario, in 1999, issuing their initial, eponymous full-length. The album's raw, moody mix of arty dub-punk with traditional rock energy and pop angles was immediately and roundly embraced. Constantines topped the college radio charts in North America. With OAKLEY HALL: A Rolling Stone New Artist to Watch, this Brooklyn six-piece - who took their name from Thomas Pynchon’s favorite cult novelist - mixes pristine coed harmonies and banjo-and-fiddle arrangements with shambling folk and fuzzy rave-ups. In 2002, singer-guitarist Pat Sullivan formed Oakley Hall with some country-curious buddies. Oakley Hall have come a long way since beginning as a ten-member collective playing honky-tonk covers in Lower East Side dives. As they pared down their lineup, Oakley Hall got better at certain pure-country elements while trying some less than conventional sounds: Claudia Mogel runs her fiddle through Marshall stacks, and Fred Wallace plays a Fender electric strung up like a banjo. “Our interest has always been in people who took country and made it their own,” Sullivan says.

 

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