TOKYO POLICE CLUB with BORN RUFFIANS and THE HONORARY TITLE at the Crofoot Ballroom

THURSDAY MARCH 19, 2009
doors at 8PM
tickets: $12 in advance (buy tickets)

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TOKYO POLICE CLUB was formed in 2005 by David Monks (vocals, bass), Josh Hook (guitar), Graham Wright (keyboards), and Greg Alsop (drums). Elephant Shell is the sound of these four early-20-somethings, now seasoned by hundreds of shows from tiny clubs to the festival throngs at Coachella and Glastonbury, delivering on every bit of promise in their rapid-fire barrage of material to date. The opening one-two of "Centennial" and "In A Cave" barely evaporates before "Graves" and "Juno" pack innumerable hooks and "what-does-that-remind-me-of" glimmers into meager 2-minute-and-change frameworks, while first single "Tessellate" and "Sixties Remake" encapsulate everything great about the manic TPC live experience: soaring guitar signatures and keyboard figures, driving backbeats and irresistible singalongs abound. Elsewhere, "The Harrowing Adventures Of..." and the down-tempo standout "Listen To The Math" find our young protagonists ably adapting their energy into more subdued structures before the rousing coda of "The Baskervilles" brings the record to an all-too-early halt. With BORN RUFFIANS: Ruffians songs have bloggers scrambling for different ways to say “quirky” and “spazzy” and “post punk” and “dance punk,” while their latest LP just shows how much broader than that are the band’s talents, and how difficult their music is to pigeonhole. If you had to play the sound-alike game, you might suggest Jonathan Richman fronting the Talking Heads, or the Violent Femmes’ Gordon Gano in the kitchen with Animal Collective—and you’d be close; but you’d miss something essential about the band’s personality, about their easy on-stage charisma, and about the unique style that’s already on display on their first full-length. Ruffians experiment with proggy time signatures, and they write songs that betray a country music influence. They can be wistful and sad, or goofy and triumphant—sometimes on the same track.
With THE HONORARY TITLE.

 

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