STARDEATH AND WHITE DWARFS with ALAN SCHEURMAN at the Pike Room

TUESDAY APRIL 14, 2009
doors at 8PM
tickets: $8 (buy tickets)

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Oklahoma City’s STARDEATH AND WHITE DWARFS is a quartet featuring the familiar-sounding vocals of Dennis Coyne, nephew of the Flaming Lips’ Wayne Coyne. Rather than running from the connection, Stardeath embraces the influence of Uncle Wayne’s band, recalling transition-period ’90s Lips. Thus, you get frayed guitars, bouncy bass, punchy drums, and scratchy, amiable vocals coaxing you into the stratosphere, making you feel right at home among the post-nuclear stars. From Jambase: "Stardeath and White Dwarfs was born in late 2004 in Oklahoma City, and released its debut EP in the spring of 2005. Members Dennis Coyne, Casey Joseph, Matt Duckworth, and Philip Rice create their own brand of genre bending sound that might occur if King Crimson and Coldplay got stoned and had sex with each other. They are currently in the studio working on their first full length record with Trent Bell of Chainsaw Kittens fame. Expect to hear the new stuff in the near future, But in the mean time you can checkout there sense assaulting laser orgy live show throughout the Midwest (like at the Pike Room) and beyond."

With the unique psychedelic folk of Detroit's ALAN SCHEURMAN: Detroit As A Portal says, "Alan's unique vocal styling shuffles between hushed soft spoken realizations and the adventurous poignant visionary rants and ramblings witnessed in Akasha. Exploration continues throughout the tracks with time given to wandering yet somehow unifying horns and space for deep sacred meditations." And says [the] Metro Times: "The psychedelic-folk blueprints laid out in Rodriguez's classic "Sugarman" — a musician and his guitar out in front, with art-rock orchestration sculpted around it — basically comprise the foundation of Old Patterns. Scheurman's voice and guitar strumming are fragile and old-fashioned against the record's recurring ominous motifs of bassy horn blasts, reverb and noise. The juxtaposition, as strange as it may sound on paper, makes for a chilly but quite sweet record."

 

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