VIVIAN GIRLS and CRYSTAL ANTLERS with LEE MARVIN COMPUTER ARM and GARDENS at the Pike Room

THURSDAY MAY 7, 2009
doors at 8PM
tickets: $8 in advance (buy tickets)

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Brooklyn band THE VIVIAN GIRLS' first record runs Shangri-Las-style pop through a post-punk wringer. Note, for instance, the Public Image Limited intro to "Such a Joke" or the Pixies reference in "No" (entire lyric: "No"). Throughout, superfuzz guitar, subterranean bass, and Moe Tucker beats buoy heavenly harmonies and guest Tim Fiore's unstoppable tambourine. Once the pounding "Tell the World" and spooky-jangly "Where Do You Run To" take up residence in your head, they won't leave anytime soon. You've been warned. Taking their name from the blonde warriors created by the outsider artist Henry Darger, the Vivian Girls mix the soft with the hard, the sweet with the sour: it’s the aural equivalent of candy, or Psychocandy.

Plus CRYSTAL ANTLERS: Crystal Antlers were once a band of chimneysweeps-doing door-to-door hustle with broom and top hat all across the same California suburbs responsible for Saccharine Trust and the Middle Class, and after a long day up on the roof they'd return to write songs that went spiraling into space. (Early favorites like "Parting Song For The Torn Sky" and "Until The Sun Dies, Part 2"-even then, they were always looking up!) They covered Mose Allison and Chocolate Watchband, had their van stolen and then returned because of their sheer karmic purity, and grew from a viciously untamed bar band to fringe-psych explorers of the first order.

'Tentacles' finds the Antlers exploding through the unclaimed space between .60s garage toughs like the Music Machine and the Misunderstood, red-eyed noiseniks like Guru Guru and Les Rallizes Denudes (whose ever-present turbine whine serves as the sound of the Crystal Antlers' circulatory system) and the mechanized motor-soul of Osmium-era Parliament. Raw want meets raw power on songs like the title track and "Until The Sun Dies Part 1," which push "Black To Comm" break-outs into "What's Goin' On?" sentiments while the trademark Antlers organ howls at lights on the horizon. Between the screamers come the scenery-the Pharoah Sanders-style sax snippets that confetti the end of "Sun Dies," the gentle oceanic drone-poem "Vapor Trail," the album intro that sounds like Blue Cheer chasing Terry Riley's "Rainbow In Curved Air." It's an album that functions as an organism-it breathes, it sleeps, it wakes up hungry and ready to chase something down.

Detroit's own LEE MARVIN COMPUTER ARM and GARDENS open!

 

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