JELLY EYES CD RELEASE with THE GREAT FICTION and ALLAN JAMES AND THE COLD WAVE in The Pike Room

FRIDAY AUGUST 21, 2009
doors at 8pm, show at 9pm
tickets: $10 (buy tickets)

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In November 2008, Detroit musician Jason Zito lost his job as the auto industry began crumbling around him. With the weight of a mortgage, the responsibility of family, and no new work coming in, he locked himself in his basement studio, building songs that echoed his situation.

With the newfound free time, he was able to spend most of the day writing and rewriting, recording and re-recording, building a handful of songs. He experimented with tone and composition, attempting to create colorful tracks that were always pleasing to the ear; and for the first time in his musical career, he recorded an entire album around his acoustic guitar.

Since he was able to dedicate so much time to the music, after only a few months those songs became the album (Scary Noises) Gods Stand Up!. He calls this project Jelly Eyes, a moniker he plans to use for future solo music. Both the name and the album title come from Shakespeare's King Lear, which he had buried his head in for several weeks prior to the album's creation.

Revolving around his most recent spiritual reorientation, his job loss, as well as his ensuing fatherhood (which he and his wife found out about in the middle of the recording process), the album is full of songs that speak to everyday life but also operate on many other levels.

This independent experimental album includes sampled drums, plenty of secondary percussion, sampled voices and noises, synthesized guitar, doubled -- or tripled -- or quadrupled vocals, and a generous helping of ethereal affectation. But the album doesn't come off too esoteric. It also feels very down to earth with organic piano and guitar texture, offering the listener an anchor so he or she can float comfortably on waves of sound.

According to Zito, this album was born out of fear -- but also the belief that in times like these, there's really nothing to be afraid of unless you place too much value on material possessions. Although he's been writing music for years, out of this tension comes some of Zito's most honest, well-written, and exciting work yet.

 

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